University of Pittsburgh

Graduate Students

John Bagnato

Jazz Studies
jfb30@pitt.edu

I am a third year jazz studies doctoral candidate interested in the relationship between jazz and the music of Latin America. I earned a BM in Jazz and Commercial Music from Manhattan School of Music and an MM in Jazz Studies from University of New Orleans, where I was a teaching fellow. My masters thesis focused on New Orleans pianist Louis Moreau Gottschalk and his association with mid-nineteenth century Latin American composers. I conducted further research on this subject during the summer of 2014 in Brazil, funded by a FLAS fellowship, and I will concentrate my dissertation on a period which found Gottschalk in Rio de Janeiro. I presented this research at the Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana along with workshops on jazz improvisation. I maintain an active performing career on the guitar, cavaquinho, and tres, and my playing has been featured on albums by Donald Harrison Jr., Mario Adnet, and Bill Summers.

Benjamin Barson

Jazz Studies
bmb119@pitt.edu

Ben BarsonI am a first year PhD candidate in jazz studies and a composer, baritone saxophonist, and political activist. Before enrolling at the University of Pittsburgh's Jazz Studies program, I was mentored by the Guggenheim Fellowship recipient Fred Ho, in Baritone saxophone technique and composition, from 2009 until Mr. Ho’s passing in April of 2014. I partnered with Mr. Ho to produce several mixed media musical projects spanning the United States, from Hawaii to most recently to in Vermont of 2014.

I have played with the bands of a diverse cross-section of innovative voices in New York City’s jazz scene, ranging from Arturo O’Farrill to Craig Harris, and have performed at New York’s prestigious cultural institutions such as the Guggenheim Museum, the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and Lincoln Center. As a producer & curator, I was responsible for the launch and development of the music program at the iconic Red Rooster in Harlem. I value working across disciplines, such as with choreo-prosodists Daria Fain and Robert Kocik, and with the poet Magdalena Gomez. In Pittsburgh, I play with a wide spectrum of musicians, from the reggae fusion music of Zambian artist Mathew Tembo to the jazz-funk band Chop Shop.

My scholarship, like my music, aims to bring stories of resistance and self-determination front and center. My current areas of interest relate to the struggles of Indigenous communities in Mexico as social actors that have challenged ecological destruction and unbridled capitalism. My prior work has related to the work of African American musicians to employ jazz and improvised music as sites of community building and challenges to racism and exploitation. I have presented my musical and scholarly work at the "Technologies of Liberation" Conference in Riviera, Mexico, with my partner, Gizelxanath Rodriguez; as well as at the Association For Asian American Studies Conference. Overall, I see no contradiction between my areas of study and consider jazz to be intrinsically transnational, while maintaining a Black American core, and thoroughly on the side of justice and self determination of oppressed peoples, ecological justice, and gender equality.

More about me can be found at BenBarsonMusic.com.

Jason Belcher

Composition/Theory
jwb79@pitt.edu

Jason BelcherI am a first year PhD candidate in Music Theory/Composition. I spent several years living in Boston, where I earned degrees from New England Conservatory in Contemporary Improvisation (BMus, 2010), and Composition (MMus 2012). My music generally deals with varying degrees of performer control, or the lack thereof. Before arriving in Pittsburgh, I lived in Vermont and New York, where I played with activist brass bands, and a variety of improvising musicians. My music can be heard at soundcloud.com/belchercomp  and jasonbelcher.bandcamp.com.

Christopher Capizzi

ccc36@pitt.edu
Jazz Studies

I am a 5th-year PhD candidate in Jazz Studies. My academic research is focused on the liturgical music of Mary Lou Williams and its intersections with black suffering, modern jazz, catholic theology, and 20th-century philosophy. A recent paper, “Suffering, Levinas and Modern Jazz: The Liturgical Music of Mary Lou Williams,” has been included in a 2014 Boston University conference anthology, African American Music in World Culture: Art as Refuge and Strength in the Struggle for Freedom (forthcoming). In 2012, I was awarded a grant by the Berger-Carter Jazz Research Fund at Rutgers University's Institute of Jazz Studies to fund my research on Williams. Since then I have presented my research throughout the U.S., U.K., and Europe. I am a composer and jazz pianist, with additional interests in the music of Cuba and performance improvisation. I have an Masters in Arts Management from Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University, and a BFA in Music Composition, with university honors, from the Carnegie Mellon School of Music.

Emilie Coakley

erc75@pitt.edu
Ethnomusicology

I am a first year PhD student in ethnomusicology. My research interests deal broadly with the use of music to navigate religious and national identities, with emphasis on music and Roman Catholic practice, specifically in Indonesia. Methodologically, I am fascinated by ideas of imagined communities, transnationalism, and questions of music and the body.  Before starting at Pitt, I received a BA in music from Mount Holyoke College and an MAR in Music and Religion from Yale Divinity School and the Institute of Sacred Music. I have presented my work at the NECSEM, the Society for Christian Scholarship in Music, "Music, Theology, and Justice" at the University of Toronto, and the "Christian Congregational Music" conference at Ripon College, Oxford and am incredibly grateful for this opportunity to continue my studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

Yuko Eguchi Wright

Ethnomusicology
yue1@pitt.edu

Yuko Eguchi WrightA native of Tokyo, Japan, I am a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology. In 2009 and 2010 I received the Japan Iron and Steel Federation Mitsubishi Foundation Fellowship and conducted research on Japanese geisha’s music called kouta and its dance style koutaburi. I am writing on these topics for my dissertation under the direction of Prof. Bell Yung. In 2012 I received a master title of kouta, Kasuga Toyoyoshiyu (春日とよ吉裕) and in 2013 the title of assistant professor of Japanese tea ceremony, Eguchi Soyu (江口宗裕).

Nathan Frink

Jazz Studies
naf21@pitt.edu

Nathan FrinkI am a saxophonist, composer, and scholar pursuing a PhD in Jazz Studies. My research interests include the acoustic characteristics and methods of transmission among avant-garde artists and the analysis of free improvisation. I will present my paper which discusses the intersection between performance, music analysis, and neuroscience at the Improvising Brain Symposium this April. My doctoral dissertation focuses on the music of Ornette Coleman from 1980–2010. I hold a bachelors degree in music from Nazareth College of Rochester, where I studied jazz under Dr. Paul Smoker and co-founded the college jazz combo, Loose Change. I went on to earn my MA in Jazz Studies from Pitt in 2011. As a saxophonist I’ve had the pleasure of  performing domestically and abroad with artists such as Bobby Few and Rasul Siddik, and I regularly perform in Pittsburgh and throughout the northeast. Since June 2011 I have been employed and mentored by legendary tenor saxophonist David Murray.

Sara Gulgas

Musicology
seg80@pitt.edu

Sara Gulgas

I am a fourth-year doctoral student in musicology specializing in Popular Music Studies. My dissertation focuses on the historical and social context of baroque rock in the 1960s, specifically its relation to hipness, memory politics, and postmodernism. Before coming to Pitt, I completed an MA in Popular Music Studies from the University of Liverpool and a BA in Music History from Youngstown State University. I have earned fellowships from the Center for Popular Music Studies at Case Western Reserve University and the Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences for research at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Library and Archives.  I have presented my research at IASPM, SEM, Music & the Moving Image, and the Music & Screen Media Conference. My work has been published in IASPM-US Music Scenes, Popular Music and Society, and I have contributed a chapter to Bruce Springsteen and Popular Music: Rhetoric, Memorial, and Contemporary Culture set for publication in 2016.

Ben Harris

Compositon/Theory
bgh7@pitt.edu

Ashley Humphrey

Ethnomusicology
arh77@Pitt.edu

Ashley HumphreyI am a third-year PhD student in Ethnomusicology. My primary research interest is focused on music of the Afro-Brazilian martial art, capoeira. My time spent as a practitioner of capoeira heavily informs my scholarship. A recent paper given at the 2013 Society for Ethnomusicology Conference entitled, “Lift Up Your Skirt!: Race, Gender, and the Sexualization of Women in Capoeira Song,” discusses intersections of race, gender, and class within the capoeira community, which will be the primary focus for my dissertation. Other areas of interest include: gender politics, music of the African diaspora, music and technology, as well as music and material culture.

Bomi Jang

Composition/Theory
boj4@pitt.edu
 

Jeffery Klein

Ethnomusicology
jfk39@pitt.edu

I am a third year PhD student in ethnomusicology. I have previously studied music of Nepal and music in the lindy hop/blues dance sub-culture. I came to Pittsburgh with a Masters in ethnomusicology from Bowling Green State University where my thesis was on how the legal system protects identity for musicians. I am currently working on a project studying urban soundscapes in Pittsburgh in order to answer the question, “What does gentrification sound like?” I also hold bachelor degrees in music and telecommunication and a JD from Wayne State University Law School. My work on voice has appeared in Popular Music and Society and I have presented papers at a number of regional and national conferences. I have also studied Nepalese sarangi and have experience performing in both Balinese and Javanese gamelan ensembles.

Young-Soo Kim

Jazz Studies
yok55@pitt.edu

Young-Soo KimA native of South Korea, I am a PhD student in Jazz Studies. I am a jazz guitarist, composer, and educator. After graduating from Sungkyunkwan University (South Korea), I went to Europe, where I studied jazz guitar in Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands. I went on to earn my MA in studio/jazz guitar from the University of Southern California in 1996. I returned to Korea and worked as an associate professor at the Dong-ah Institute of Media & Arts for eight years. During that time I operated my own music school and live jazz club in Korea. In 2009 I returned to US to enter the doctoral program in Music Education/Jazz Studies at the University of Northern Colorado, from where I later transferred to the PhD program in Jazz Studies at the University of Pittsburgh.

Nizan Leibovich

Composition/Theory
nil28@pitt.edu

Lu-Han Li

Composition/Theory
lul31@pitt.edu

Da Lin

Ethnomusicology
dal63@pitt.edu

Da LinI received a BA in Musicology from Xi’an Conservatory of Music, China and an MA in Ethnomusicology from University of Pittsburgh. My Master's thesis, “Media, Market Economy, and Cultural Transformation: Qin Music in Contemporary China,” investigates a history of mass mediation of qin music after the 1950s. I am currently a PhD candidate in Ethnomusicology, supported by an Andrew Mellon Predoctoral Fellowship and a Chancellor’s Graduate Fellowship. My dissertation explores the political economy of Kunqu Opera in 21st century China. My research interests also include music and mediation, Intangible Cultural Heritages (ICH), music and cultural theories, and music industry.

Charles Lwanga

Ethnomusicology
chl124@pitt.edu

Dr. Charles LwangaI am a composer/theorist and a PhD student in Ethnomusicology, specializing in popular music, politics, power, and class formation in Uganda. I previously received a three-year Fulbright fellowship towards the completion of my PhD in Composition and Theory at the University of Pittsburgh, which I completed in 2012. Since then I have been a Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Teaching Fellow. My most recent publication on bridging ethnomusicology and composition appeared in Analytical Approaches to World Music. I came to Pitt after completing an MA at Makerere University, where I am currently an Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition.

Alec MacIntyre

Ethnomusicology
kam291@pitt.edu

I am a third year PhD student in ethnomusicology, specializing in gender and the voice in popular music. My planned dissertation project is a multi-site ethnographic study of vocalities in drag, transgender, and other gender-variant communities. Before entering doctoral study at Pitt, I completed a Masters of Music in ethnomusicology at U.T. Austin, focusing on intersectional racial and gender dynamics in Cuban popular music of the 1930s. I am also an accomplished guitarist, having played and taught professionally prior to beginning graduate studies. I retain an interest in playing and writing about guitar in popular music.

Michael Mackey

Jazz Studies
mpm63@pitt.edu

I am a fourth-year doctoral student in Jazz Studies. I have presented research on Pittsburgh-born jazz pianist Ahmad Jamal, the music of Mary Lou Williams, Duke Ellington, and John Coltrane. Prior to coming to Pitt, I completed a BS in Music Education and an MM in Piano Performance at Duquesne University. Before returning to academic study, I served as the Director of Bands in the South Fayette School District. During my eight-year tenure, I directed a number of middle school and high school ensembles, including the award-winning “Little Green Machine” Marching Band, and I started the district’s first jazz ensemble in over 40 years. Outside the classroom, I am the Director of Music at Holy Child Roman Catholic Parish in Bridgeville, PA. In addition to my work as a pianist, I also perform as a free-lance trumpeter and vocalist.

Danielle Maggio

Ethnomusicology
dam217@pitt.edu

Danielle MaggioI am a second year PhD student in Ethnomusicology. My research examines soul music as a lived cultural practice, an artistic genre, a marketable commodity, and an important historical site for the articulation of gender, race and class in American popular culture. I am currently engaged in an oral history project in Chicago which examines the interplay between political activism, black cultural politics, and performing arts through the musical and political affirmation of “Soul Power.”  Prior to coming to Pitt, I received my BA from an interdisciplinary Cultural Studies program at Columbia College Chicago. Before returning to academic study, I immersed myself in non-profit work as a teaching artist for the MGR Foundation where I taught an Artistic Activism class that engaged at risk youth with performance, history and community. I have also been an instructor for Pittsburgh Montessori schools, Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ, The South Side Community Arts Center in Chicago, IL, and Recreational Arts, Inc. in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. I have presented papers at the Cultural Studies Association Conference, the “Popular Music and Communities” conference at Case Western Reserve University, and the Ann Arbor Symposium IV “Teaching Popular Music” at The University of Michigan.

Lee (Ellie) Martin

Jazz Studies
lem74@pitt.edu

Ellie MartinI am a fourth-year PhD candidate in Jazz Studies, beginning a dissertation that will explore sonic and linguistic functions in vocalese performance, with an emphasis on vocality, reception, and critical race theory. Prior to coming to Pittsburgh, I completed a BM in Vocal Performance from McGill University and an MM in Jazz Voice Performance from the University of Toledo. While at the University of Toledo, I worked closely with legendary vocalese artist, Jon Hendricks and completed an oral history thesis on his developmental years. In addition to my degree in Jazz Studies, I am completing a PhD certificate in Cultural Studies. I currently teach class piano and recitations for the History of Jazz.

Ben McBrayer

Musicology
bmm71@pitt.edu

Ben McBrayerA PhD candidate in musicology at the University of Pittsburgh, I am currently writing my dissertation on phenomenologies of music in France after the Second World War. My research interests also include the history of English opera, conceptions of American opera, and modernism in twentieth-century French music. I received an M.M. from the University of Cincinnati, College-Conservatory of Music, where I wrote a thesis entitled "The Specter of Peter Grimes: Aesthetics and Reception in the Renascence of English Opera, 1945-53." I also hold a bachelor's degree in music from the University of Dayton.

Ryan McMasters

Composition and Theory
rcm42@pitt.edu

Ryan McMastersI am a first year PhD student in composition and theory at the University of Pittsburgh. My music focuses on the twin concepts of stillness and expansion. As a sound designer and composer, my work has been embraced by theater and dance companies both local and international. In addition to composing, I am a double bass soloist specializing in contemporary music and improvisation. Before coming to Pitt, I completed an MM at The Hartt School with Robert Black and completed my undergraduate work at Duquesne University.

Jeffrey Mierzejewski

Musicology
jam362@pitt.edu

Irene Monteverde

Jazz Studies
iim4@pitt.edu


Irene MonteverdeI am a Pittsburgh native and a first year PhD candidate in Jazz Studies.  I am currently a teaching assistant to Professor Geri Allen in the University of Pittsburgh's "History of Jazz" course.  I studied for three years at the Fondazione Siena Jazz in Siena, Italy, under the instruction of Alessandro Giachero.  My graduation thesis on Astrology and Jazz accompanied two concerts - in Siena, Italy and Carnegie, PA - featuring the UDOO Smart Theremin.  Since returning to the states in 2014, I have been involved with the Carnegie Arts Initiative, including teaching music to children at the Boys and Girls Club. I hold a BA from Duquesne University in International Business and Marketing and worked in the finance industry for a Pittsburgh-based S&P500 company for four years.

Steven Moon

Ethnomusicology
steven.moon@pitt.edu

I am a second-year graduate student studying ethnomusicology. Currently, my work focuses on the performance of queer masculinities in Turkish musics, particularly within the hip-hop scene. With broad interests in queer theory and masculinity studies, I hope to expand conversations about global gender studies that acknowledge the lexical limitations of Anglo-American scholarship. Previously, my work in Turkey has focused on the intersections of music and violence, especially during the Gezi Park Protests. At Pitt, I am a two-time recipient of the Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, funded by the US Department of Education and granted by the Center for Russian and Eastern European Studies. I am also pursuing a PhD certificate in Global Studies, with an emphasis on Change Identities. Most recently, I received a Critical Language Scholarship to study Turkish in Baku, Azerbaijan during the summer of 2016, funded by the US State Department and administered by the American Councils for International Education.

Kevin O'Brien

Musicology
kso11@pitt.edu

I am second year PhD candidate in Musicology specializing in American popular music. I received my B.A. from James Madison University and my MM from the University of Tennessee, where I completed my master's thesis on comic song performance in the 19th- and early 20th-century American parlor. In 2013 I received a Dietrich School of Arts and Science's Research Fellowship from the University of Pittsburgh. I have presented papers at numerous regional historical, ethnomusicological, and medieval conferences. My current research interests include American minstrelsy, vaudeville, intersections of music and comedy, music in animation, Jamaican popular music, and identity formation.

John Petrucelli

Jazz Studies
jop69@pitt.edu

John PetrucelliI am a second year PhD candidate in the Jazz Studies program specializing in saxophone performance, composition and interdisciplinary studies. I came to the University of Pittsburgh after receiving an MM in Jazz Performance and an MA in Jazz History of Research under the tutelage of Dr. Lewis Porter and Professor Ralph Bowen. My thesis, Motivic and Harmonic Analysis of Warne Marsh: The Unissued Copenhagen Studio Recordings, can be viewed on Rutgers ETD and a book of transcriptions has been released by Score Muse Publishing Company. Currently I teach Fundamentals of Piano and work under Dr. Doretta Whalen as a teaching assistant for the History of Jazz.

Meng Ren

Ethnomusicology
mer78@pitt.edu

Meng RenI am a PhD candidate in ethnomusicology and a specialist in the music of China. My dissertation investigates the staging of the Mulan story in Chinese traditional opera during the Korean War (1950–3). I was awarded the John & Pat Hume Scholarship (2007–9) from National University of Ireland and the Chancellor’s Fellowship in Chinese Studies (2009–12) from University of Pittsburgh. Both my MA theses—one on Gustav Mahler (in musicology) and the other on folksong in Northwest China (in ethnomusicology)—have been published as journal articles. I completed a BA in German and Music at the National University of Ireland. Since 2007, I have presented at various conferences on Chinese Studies, Asian Studies, Drama Studies, and Music in Ireland, the UK, and USA.

Brian Riordan

Composition/Theory
brr48@pitt.edu

Brian RiordanI am a second year graduate student at The University of Pittsburgh where I am pursuing a PhD in Music Composition and Theory and am currently a Teaching Assistant for Basic Musicianship. I received a Bachelor of Arts degree in music with an emphasis on percussion performance and composition at North Central College in Naperville, IL. I have also studied folkloric drumming in Havana Cuba. My current music interests are musical collages as well as combining acoustic instruments with performable electronics in real-time. I am currently working on a book that explores the rare area of interpreting middle eastern rhythmic modes. Alongside composing, I am an avid educator, performer, and improviser. I have performed in numerous ensembles ranging from classical, rock, jazz, and experimental music throughout The United States.

Ramteen Sazegari

Composition/Theory
ras182@pitt.edu

My music is informed by a synthesis of perspectives; the gestural and architectural framework shared by both concert and electronic music has lead him to create narratives that explore the juxtaposition of ambiance against modernist structures. Through my music, I work to reconcile the unrefined cultural expression of non-concert music and concert music's faceless aesthetic complexity. Among the honors I have received are the UC Davis Olga Brose Valente Memorial Prize for excellence in Music Composition and the Iron Composer Competition of the Cortona Sessions for New Music. I was also a finalist in the 2010 DuoSolo Emerging Composer Competition. My compositions have been performed by the UC Davis Symphony Orchestra and the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, and have been featured at the Oklahoma State University Festival of Contemporary Music.

Laura Schwartz

lrschwartz@pitt.edu
Composition/Theory

I am a first-year PhD student in Music Composition and Theory. I attended the University of California, Davis (BA in music 2013) and Illinois State University (MM in composition 2015).  My music was performed during the 2014 Oregon Bach Festival Composer’s Symposium, the 2015 Oregon Symposium of Graduate Musicians, LA Phil’s Next on Grand: National Composer’s Intensive 2015, and 2015 Nief Norf festival. I am currently interested in creating music that explores dichotomies between pleasure and pain, noise and pitch, and aural and visual.  Interested in listening? Examples of my music can be found at soundcloud.com/laura-rose-schwartz, and vimeo.com/laurarschwartz.

Jonathan Shold

Musicology
jms421@pitt.edu

Jonathan SholdI am a fourth year teaching fellow and PhD student in Musicology specializing in 20th-century music. My research interests include minimalism, New Age nature recordings, neoclassicism, and philosophies of time. Before coming to Pitt I completed degrees in music history at Bowling Green State University (MM, 2011) and Wheaton College, Illinois (BM, 2009). My master’s thesis, “‘Temporalities of Timelessness’ in Stravinsky’s Neoclassical Apotheoses,” explores how early twentieth-century philosophies of time intersect with the concept of apotheosis in Stravinsky’s neoclassical ballets.

Max Hylton Smith

Musicology
mhs39@pitt.edu

Max Hylton SmithI’m a PhD candidate in Musicology studying musical theater.  My dissertation builds on research I presented at the 2013 AMS conference, investigating sound as an element of spatial design in works off-Broadway.  My undergraduate studies in piano and classical languages at the University of the South inform other of my research interests, in embodied musicology, critical and queer theories, as well as my master’s work on fin-de-siècle aesthetics (“Touching Maurice: A Body-Based Reading of Ravel’s Ondine”).  While a Teaching Fellow at Pitt, I am also part of the Graduate Student Organization and assistant organizer of the department’s colloquium series.

Codee Spinner

Musicology
cas316@pitt.edu
I am a first year graduate student of Musicology at the University of Pittsburgh. I received a Bachelor of Music in Music Education from State University of New York at Fredonia. My research interests include ideas of nationalism in American and Russian music. I am primarily interested in American music of the late 19th century and the use of music in Progressive era social movements and activism. I am currently teaching Class Piano and recitations for Music Theory.

Sookyung Sul

Composition/Theory
sos25@pitt.edu

Sookyung SulOriginally from Seoul, Korea, I joined the PhD program at Pitt in 2009 after completing an MA in Music Composition and Theory at Carnegie Mellon University. My dissertation focuses on Gubaidulina’s compositional process of drawing on the number series and ‘rhythm of form” in her Quasi Hoquetus for Viola, Bassoon and Piano. My orchestra piece, Seoul 2008 was chosen for the reading session with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. Last fall the Hwaum Chamber Orchestra in Korea premiered my string orchestra piece, The Cyclic of Encounters, and my recent duo, Baram and Mool for Oboe and Cello, has been selected as a finalist for the 2014 International Composition Competition sponsored by the Women Composers Festival of Hartford.

Julie Van Gyzen

Musicology
jav76@pitt.edu

I am a 2nd year PhD student in Historical Musicology. Hailing from Boston, I obtained my BM in Clarinet Performance from Rhode Island College and MFA in Musicology from Brandeis University where I wrote my master’s thesis, “La Victoire du peril rose: Contextualizing Sociological Narratives and Wagnerian Aesthetics in Lili Boulanger’s Faust et Hélène.” I was awarded the A&S Fellowship in 2014 and am currently teaching Fundamentals of Music Theory and Class Piano. My current research focuses on French women composers between the World Wars, with particular interest in musical narratives of political and sociological activism and resistance.

Juan Velasquez

Musicology
Juv10@pitt.edu

Juan VelasquezI am a second year grad student in Musicology program, focusing on how modernity and modernization affected Latin American musical practice since the second half of the 19th century. I am interested in how the learning, interpretation, spreading, and composition of music reflected new imaginaries, models of representation, and ideas. I received my MA in music from Eafit University in Medellín, Colombia. My research has been supported by grants from the Carolina Foundation of Spain and the Secretary of Culture of Medellín. My first book, The Echoes of the Village: The Music in Periodical Publications of Medellín (1886-1903), was published in 2012. My current work at the University of Pittsburgh is supported by a Fulbright Fellowship.

Xinyang Wang

Composition/Theory
xiw86@pitt.edu

Jeff Weston

Composition/Theory
jmw212@pitt.edu

I compose music at the University of Pittsburgh, where I am a third-year PhD Fellow working towards a doctorate in Music Composition and Theory and a PhD Certificate in Cultural Studies. my music is concentrated on exploring modes of expressivity through the interactions of balance, repetition, space and physicality. My current analysis interests include the use of music in Hermann Nitsch’s Aktions. I have studied composition with Amy Williams, Eric Moe, Christopher Dietz, Mikel Kuehn, Elainie Lillios, and Brooke Joyce. I have garnered performances and fellowships at such venues as the International Young Composers’ Forum, Vox Novus Composers’ Voice Series, Cal State University New Music Festival, Red Note New Music Festival, North American Saxophone Alliance National Conference, Contagious Sounds Series, Iowa Composers’ Forum, Bowling Green State University New Music Festival, University of Alberta NCounters Festival, University of Toronto, soundSCAPE Festival in Maccagno, Italy and Radio France. Before coming to Pitt I completed a MM in Music Composition at Bowling Green State University where I served as graduate assistant for the Mid American Center for Contemporary Music.

Hei Ting (Hety) Wong

Ethnomusicology
hew25@pitt.edu

Hei Ting WongI just completed a MA degree in ethnomusicology from University of Pittsburgh with a thesis on Leehom Wang's music in the ethnic-Chinese diaspora. Prior to attending graduate school at Pitt, I completed a Bachelor of Social Science (Hons) in Sociology from The Chinese University of Hong Kong and a Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics from the University of Oregon. I began learning Thai classical music and Javanese Gamelan when I was in the exchange program at National University of Singapore. My research focuses on Chinese popular music—including both Cantonese and Mandarin music—in relation to identity construction, media and new media development, and political influences in post-colonial Hong Kong. I am qualified in Grade 8 Singing of ABRSM, and I have worked as a choral conductor and secondary school teacher in Hong Kong. During the 2015–16 academic year, I am a resident scholar at the David C. Lam Institute for East-West Studies at Hong Kong Baptist University.​

Bryan Wright

Musicology
bsw12@pitt.edu

Bryan WrightI hold a BA from the College of William and Mary in 2005 with a double major in music and religion and an MA at the University of Pittsburgh. My research interests range from Renaissance motets—my MA thesis analyses the six-voice motets of Michael Des Buissons—to American popular music of the early 20th century. I am also interested in Appalachian "old-time" music and music of the Middle East. I has presented papers at regional and national meetings of the Society for Ethnomusicology and the American Musicological Society. As a pianist I regularly perform at ragtime and jazz festivals, including the JVC Jazz Festival in New York City and the Scott Joplin International Ragtime Festival in Sedalia, MO. I have released two solo CDs (Syncopated Musings in 2004 and Breakin' Notes in 2010) and a 78 rpm record set of the "Modern Piano Solos" of Bix Beiderbecke. In 2013, I was the Scott Joplin Foundation's Artist in Residence. Additionally, I am the founder of Rivermont Records, a Grammy-nominated record label specializing in ragtime and early jazz. Visit my website at: www.bryanswright.com.

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