University of Pittsburgh

Musicology

The musicology program, working with ethnomusicology and music theory, promotes the integration of in-depth historical research with a broad range of methodologies. Graduate students in musicology build skills in a variety of critical approaches to music, including cultural, textual, and musico-literary studies, critical theory. and historiography. The work towards the master’s degree provides students with a firm grasp of the repertory and major methods of music history, ethnomusicology, theory and analysis, and bibliography. On their way to earning the PhD, students are encouraged to broaden the scope of their work and not only consult with faculty members from other music subdisciplines, but also draw on the resources of other departments.

Faculty expertise ranges from the music of the Italian Renaissance, French and German Baroque, and Russian opera and American musical theater…to the study of music printing and performance practice…to issues of popular music, urbanization, and questions of memory and embodiment.

Performance experience is available in the University Orchestra, the Gamelan Ensemble, the Jazz Ensemble, and the African Drumming Ensemble, as well as informal chamber music ensembles and performances of works by our graduate student composers.

Students may also work toward graduate certificates in a number of programs, including Asian Studies, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Russian and East European Studies, West European Studies, Latin American Studies, Cultural Studies, and Women's Studies.

Musicology Faculty

James Cassaro heads the music library, teaches the proseminar on Principles of Research and Bibliography, and serves on thesis committees. His research centers on French baroque music, American music, and 19th-century Italian opera.

Rachel Mundy specializes in “Animanities,” humanities topics for the non-human subject; twentieth-century American and French music; Olivier Messiaen and birdsong; and traditional Japanese music. 

Anna Nisnevich specializes in 19th- and 20th-century Russian music. Her recent publications and presentations focus on Glinka, Chaikovsky, Glazunov, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich. She has lectured for San Francisco Opera and Cal Performances. In April 2005 she co-organized the interdisciplinary conference "Glinka and his Legacies" at the University of California, Berkeley.

Deane Root is director of Pitt's Center for American Music and is past president of the Society for American Music. As an authority on Stephen Foster and 19th-century American popular music, as well as on teaching with music in secondary schools, he frequently serves as a consultant for media companies and appears on broadcasts for the Public Broadcasting System, BBC, and ARTE.

Emily Zazulia teaches History of Western Music to 1750, Introduction to Western Art Music, and Renaissance Music: Reason, Ritual, and Representation. Her areas of research include Medieval and Renaissance music, Late-Medieval music notation, the history of music theory, and manuscript studies.


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